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Zamboni by Bill Holman. Arranged by Bill Holman. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. The Bill Holman Big Band Series. From the Holman CD "Hommage". Bright Swing / Marvelous Chart. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-942). What a marvelous chart this is! The "engine" which keeps on going is a 4-bar vamp in the rhythm section. It occurs throughout the piece and ties everything together beautifully. Set in a bright swinging tempo, the chart opens with 8 bars of brushes and swings on from there. There is also solo space for tenor saxophone. Holman uses some marvelous brass effects all through the piece. This requires soprano saxophone on the alto 1 and 2 parts. 5-4-4-4 (on demo CD 117) As recorded on the new CD "Hommage.".
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Chet's Call by Metheny / Mays. Arranged by Bob Curnow. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. The Pat Metheny Big Band Series. Swing. Grade 4. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-981). This piece was never recorded by the Pat Metheny Group. It was "lost in history" until discovered on a 1985 radio transcription. Pat says this was written for a gig with Charlie Haden, Billy Higgins and Chet Baker "that never happened." It is a wonderful, swinging tune that has solo space for alto sax, trumpet (or trombone) and drums. "Chet's Call" is a very playable piece, with limited range concerns. This is a side of Pat & Lyle that is rarely heard these days. A great tune ! 5-4-4-4 (on demo CD 117).
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Begin The Beguine by Cole Porter. Arranged by Bill Holman. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. Doc Severinsen Series. Up Tempo Swing. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-950). As recorded on "Tonight Show Band, Vol. 1" (Amherst), Holman has set this wonderful standard in a hard-driving swing, with lots of great ensemble section writing. The piece features a challenging trumpet solo and also a tenor saxophone solo. This chart was played on-air countless times on the old Carson show. Johnny loved it, and so will you and your band. 5-5-4-4 (on demo CD 117).
$67.00

Genres: Broadway, Standards, Swing, Jazz & Blues
Bugle Call Rag by Traditional. Arranged by Bill Holman. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. Doc Severinsen Series. Fast Swing. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-951). As recorded by the Tonight Show Band on "Once More With Feeling" (Amherst), this wonderful chart is the hottest "flag-waver" of all time. Holman starts things out with the trumpet section's "call to arms," and things swing on from there. There is, of course, a trumpet solo and also room for an extensive tenor saxophone solo. Everything builds to a strong, exciting ending. You'll love it. 5-5-4-3 (on demo CD 117).
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Honeysuckle Rose by Thomas "Fats" Waller. Arranged by Bill Holman. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. Doc Severinsen Series. Fast Swing. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-952). As recorded by the Tonight Show Band on "Once More With Feeling" (Amherst), this bright, swinging chart is a blast ! Bill Holman is at his best, weaving descending unison lines with the tune stated by trumpet and tenor sax (both of which are given solo space). Fats Waller would have loved this, especially the great "shout" chorus. Reasonable ranges throughout. 5-5-4-3 (on demo CD 117).
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Opals by Frank Strazzeri. Arranged by Rob Pronk. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. Jazz Masters Series. Medium Slow Swing. Grade 4. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-990).
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Jumpin' At The Woodside by Count Basie. Arranged by Tommy Newsom. Jazz Ensemble / Jazz Band. Doc Severinsen Series. Grade 5. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-1011).
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing by Duke Ellington (1899-1974). Arranged by Tommy Newsom. For jazz ensemble. Doc Severinsen Series. Swing. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-1040). This chart was one of the staples in the Tonight Show Band book, and they performed this often. Tommy created a wonderful setting for this classic jazz standard. There is solo space for trumpet and tenor saxophone and lots of wonderful ensemble writing.
$67.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Standards, Swing
Separately Together by Neil Slater. Arranged by Neil Slater. For jazz ensemble. University of North Texas One O'Clock. Swing. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-1060). Neil brings us yet another brilliant, original piece in the ECM style. This chart is full of exciting textures and colors set in a moderate jazz feel/tempo. There is solo space (written and improvised) for piano and trumpet. Exactly as recorded by the North Texas One O'Clock Band (2008), this wonderful composition will lend variety and a lot of interest and class to your program.
$67.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Anthropology by Claude Thornhill. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gil Evans. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8123). Background: Before World War II, the Claude Thornhill Orchestra's popularity was as a 'sweet' band. With the integrated sound of clarinets, saxes, trumpets, French horns, trombones and rhythm section playing under the leader's virtuosic piano solos, and the arrangements of the leader, Gil Evans and some others, the band made some beautiful recordings and was fairly successful. After a short stint in the Navy, Thornhill laid low for awhile until he put his band back together in 1946. This ensemble would become legendary as composer/arranger Gil Evans' personal workshop, as Thornhill virtually gave the band to him to do as he pleased. While Evans understood that this was still an ensemble that played popular music (and Evans certainly wrote his share of dreamy, lovely ballads and medleys), he not only gave writing opportunities to Gerry Mulligan (whom Evans mentored after the saxophonist/arranger left Gene Krupa) and George Russell (who was starting to formulate what would be his Lydian Chromatic Concept), but Evans explored the new world of modern jazz called 'bebop.' The results were the legendary trilogy of settings for Anthropology, Donna Lee, and Yardbird Suite. Most of the Thornhill musicians had little experience playing the new music, so Evans taught it to them. Thornhill was not pleased by these pieces and they were not played when he was on the stand, although he recorded the first two titles a few times. Thornhill and Evans parted musical company in early 1948, and later that year, Mulligan, Russell, Johnny Mandel, John Carisi and John Lewis joined with Gil to create a smaller ensemble that would sound like the Thornhill band. Thus was born the Miles Davis Nonet. The Music: Anthropology was written by Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. Evans arranged the line in 1947, and it was recorded for Columbia Records and for radio transcriptions. The instrumentation calls for 5 saxophones doubling clarinet, 3 trumpets, 2 trombones, 2 French horns, tuba, guitar, piano, bass, and drums. For this publication, the French horn and tuba parts alternately may be played by a 4th trumpet and trombones 3 and 4 as follows: French horn 1 = Trumpet 4; French horn 2 = Trombone 3; Tuba = Trombone 4 Conductors are strongly urged not to double these parts; if you have both French horns and Tuba, do not use the trumpet and trombone parts. As with Yardbird Suite, Evans notated swing rhythms as dotted-eighth & sixteenth, not two eighths. This figure has been changed in this publication to two eighths for ease of reading. Bars 129 to 141 were later extracted and re-orchestrated for what was probably an experiment by Evans to test out different ways of scoring these bars for the Miles Davis Nonet. Though the parts have the name Anthropology written at the top, the piece is not quoted directly. These bars were later used as a theme for the two extant broadcasts of the Nonet from the Royal Roost. Notes to the Conductor: The first time I heard this treatment of the Parker/Gillespie line, I laughed because Evans used one of the trademark colors of the Thornhill ensemble (clarinets, alto saxes and cup-muted trumpets) and applied it for a modern jazz theme. This would have been the last group of instruments that most arrangers would use on such a theme, but as Miles Davis said, "That's Gil for you." This arrangement simply doesn't work when played slower than quarter note = 200, so the altos, clarinets and trumpets not only have to practice their parts to play the music smoothly, but should practice together to get the best blend possible. As you know, unisons are often problematic when instrumental color and wide melodic contours are present, and are additionally challenging given that the clarinets are in the key of A, and the alto saxes in E! From bar 105 through bar 141, the ensemble has a huge challenge: to play the figures together without dragging and to maintain accurate intonation in the concert key of G Major. Sectional rehearsals with this section played VERY slowly at first are a must. If you have any interest in performing music from any of the Davis/Evans settings for Columbia Records, this is an example of the many minefields that are present (think of Springsville from Miles Ahead). Also observe the subtle use of dynamics as indicated by Evans. As I have experienced with my students ensembles, mastery of this difficult music is cause for celebration, and the more you play it, the more relaxed it will sound. -Jeffrey Sultanof (Editor).
$65.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Swing, Smooth Jazz, Jazz
Brilliant Corners by The Thelonious Monk Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Oliver Nelson. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8363). Background: Thelonious Monk had gone from a quirky pianist/composer to international star, in many ways thanks to a Columbia Records recording contract that began in 1962. Like fellow jazz artists on the label such as Dave Brubeck and Miles Davis, worldwide distribution of his recordings resulted in important engagements and tours all over the globe. By 1968 however, Columbia Records was changing its focus with regard to jazz and popular music. The home of Tony Bennett, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis as well as Brubeck and Davis was now the home of Janis Joplin, Simon and Garfunkel, The Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, so Bennett, Mathis and company were now encouraged to modernize. Miles Davis was going in that direction anyway, so he would have little problem at the label in the years to come. Mathis and Williams went pop/rock by choosing their songs carefully and were quite successful. Bennett refused to be something he wasn't, and finished out his contract with no support from the label (one of the albums he made during this period was one of his finest, arranged and conducted by Robert Farnon; it was barely released in the U.S.). Brubeck just left the label. Thelonious Monk was in an unusual position at that time. He'd completed a problematic but successful international tour with an all-star octet/nonet, which was inexcusably not recorded by Columbia (some recordings from this tour are available on unauthorized CDs). He wasn't composing much new material, and Columbia wanted him to record songs written by the Beatles. His days were clearly numbered, but Columbia ended his contract with a bang: he made an album of his songs with big band. If anyone was a good fit to arrange the music of Thelonious Monk, (besides Hall Overton, arranger for Monk's appearances at Town Hall and Philharmonic Hall), it was Oliver Nelson. By 1968, Nelson was a resident of Los Angeles after spending many years as part of the New York jazz scene. A saxophonist who had a very wide musical range, from rhythm and blues to hard bop and concert music for chamber groups and symphonic orchestra, he continued to write for singers, tour with his own small and large ensembles, and was now writing for television and motion pictures. He must have been delighted to work with Monk, but it was clear that this album was to be done quickly. Nelson's arrangements are very straightforward (theme, solos, out-chorus), written for four reeds, six brass, guitar, bass, drums, and Monk. The album was recorded in three three-hour sessions, two of which were done in one day. The album itself received little publicity, and did not last long in the catalog. Notes to the Conductor: As stated above, these arrangements are not complex and can be easily prepared for concerts and competitions. They can be opened up for any and all soloists, not just piano, trumpet and tenor sax. We have chosen to leave the instrumentation the way Nelson had it (4 reeds, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, guitar, piano, bass, drums); no optional parts have been added. When Nelson arranged these pieces, there were no lead sheets, so Monk played them for the arranger, who took them down. Several years ago, publisher Don Sickler prepared a folio of Monk lead sheets published by Thelonious Music and distributed by Hal Leonard; I was one of the editors who worked with Don. All melodies in these big band settings conform to the authorized versions of the compositions as published in the Monk fakebook. This arrangement is based on Oliver Nelson's original autograph score - this is not a transcription. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Clair De Lune by Harry James. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Jack Matthias. For Big Band. Swing. Medium. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8760). When Harry James decided to follow the lead of fellow bandleader Artie Shaw and add a string section, he had to build a book quickly. Besides originals, new pop songs and older songs (one of which, You Made Me Love You, would make his ensemble one of the most popular in the country), his book included arrangements of classical or concert music, three of which were piano pieces that James particularly liked: Arabesque, Golliwogs Cakewalk, and Clair de Lune.The Music: Debussy wrote Clair de Lune as early as 1890, but was published in 1905 as part of Suite Bergamasque. It is possible that the piece was slightly revised by Debussy between its original composition and publication. By 1941, it had become quite a popular piece among piano students and soloists, and James felt it would be recognizable enough to be added to the dance book. The late James Maher often reminded me that big bands during this era played all styles of music for dancing. Even bands led by Fletcher Henderson and Benny Goodman played tangos and waltzes if they were requested; Sy Oliver told me that there were waltzes in the Jimmie Lunceford book, one of the hottest swing bands of the era. So a waltz was hardly a novelty for a big band, particularly one with a string section. It appears that chief arranger Jack Matthias arranged this title, along with Debussy's Arabesque. The original score of Clair de Lune exists, and was used to prepare this edition; unfortunately, there is no name on the score, and no extant parts. The score is filled with note errors, suggesting that the arrangement was prepared in a hurry; perhaps it was one of the first batch of scores created when the string section was added to the James band. Notes to the Conductor: This score was never recorded and there are no airchecks available, so the editor must make a number of decisions so that it can be played. The obvious first step is to find any wrong notes and correct them. The second is to determine the tempo, which is missing; it is not unusual for tempo markings to be missing on music for big bands from any era (Ive examined far too many scores where the tempo must be guessed at, using available information and many years of experience studying and directing this music). Because any score written for a big band was fair game to be recorded (and Arabesque was, but not released until many years later), Ive determined the tempo to be quarter note between 132-148 bpm. There is little more than a verbal sketch for the drum part, so I suggest that the part be played by brushes as subtly as possible (this is hardly a Viennese-style waltz). Dynamics and articulation have been added to all parts (elements all-too-often missing, as such information was communicated during rehearsal). Doubles: The reed section features 3 clarinets and 1 bass clarinet throughout.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Disapproachment by The Duke Pearson Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Frank Foster. For Big Band. Swing. Advanced. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8150). (From the forward by Jeffrey Sultanof) Frank Foster is still best known for his many years as saxophonist/arranger for Count Basie. By the early sixties, he began to be heavily influenced by John Coltrane, and Basie gave him less and less solo space. By 1964, he was a freelance musician and led his own big band in New York. He shared solo space with Lew Tabackin as a member of Duke Pearson's band, and brought some of his original music to add to Pearson's book. "Disapproachment" is in Rob McConnell's words, a 'blister,' a piece that burns from beginning to end, and since little of Foster's music from this era is currently available, is wonderful to have. The keys to a great performance are mastery of the musical figures at such a fast tempo, observation of the dynamic markings (not everything is loud) and a strong rhythm section that can keep the tempo steady. It is a great concert opener and can be opened up for more solos. Ranges: Trumpet 1: to E6; Trombone 1: Bb4.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Flying Home by The Terry Gibbs Dream Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Med Flory. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8184). Here is Med Flory's great arrangement of the Benny Goodman/Lionel Hampton standard as recorded by the Terry Gibbs Dream band. This was written to feature vibraphonist Terry Gibbs but it also features a trumpet solo. We have also included vibraphone cues on the piano part so in the event that you don't have access to vibes this may be played as a piano feature instead.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Ground Hog by The Duke Pearson Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Duke Pearson. For Big Band. Swing. Medium Easy. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8160). Here is one of the great charts from the 'Introducing the Duke Pearson Big Band' record from 1967. This is a really laid back and relatively easy chart to play. We've expanded this chart to include an open solo section which was used when the band played this arrangement live. The open section was omitted due to the time constraints of the LP format. The arrangement is graded as medium level as trombone 1 gets to a B flat 4. Otherwise this is an easy arrangement. Ranges: Trumpet 1 to G5; Trombone 1 to B flat 4. About 2010 Midwest Clinic Performance Pieces This title was performed at the 2010 Midwest Clinic, the largest band and choral educational conference in the United States. Over thirty performances are given each year by diverse ensembles of varying levels - elementary school, high school, college, military and more. Each performance title is carefully selected and represents the very best in educational sheet music. The Midwest Clinic aims to raise the standards of music education while supporting teachers and music educators.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Let's Cool One by The Thelonious Monk Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Oliver Nelson. For Big Band. Swing. Medium Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8364). Background: Thelonious Monk had gone from a quirky pianist/composer to international star, in many ways thanks to a Columbia Records recording contract that began in 1962. Like fellow jazz artists on the label such as Dave Brubeck and Miles Davis, worldwide distribution of his recordings resulted in important engagements and tours all over the globe. By 1968 however, Columbia Records was changing its focus with regard to jazz and popular music. The home of Tony Bennett, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis as well as Brubeck and Davis was now the home of Janis Joplin, Simon and Garfunkel, The Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, so Bennett, Mathis and company were now encouraged to modernize. Miles Davis was going in that direction anyway, so he would have little problem at the label in the years to come. Mathis and Williams went pop/rock by choosing their songs carefully and were quite successful. Bennett refused to be something he wasn't, and finished out his contract with no support from the label (one of the albums he made during this period was one of his finest, arranged and conducted by Robert Farnon; it was barely released in the U.S.). Brubeck just left the label. Thelonious Monk was in an unusual position at that time. He'd completed a problematic but successful international tour with an all-star octet/nonet, which was inexcusably not recorded by Columbia (some recordings from this tour are available on unauthorized CDs). He wasn't composing much new material, and Columbia wanted him to record songs written by the Beatles. His days were clearly numbered, but Columbia ended his contract with a bang: he made an album of his songs with big band. If anyone was a good fit to arrange the music of Thelonious Monk, (besides Hall Overton, arranger for Monk's appearances at Town Hall and Philharmonic Hall), it was Oliver Nelson. By 1968, Nelson was a resident of Los Angeles after spending many years as part of the New York jazz scene. A saxophonist who had a very wide musical range, from rhythm and blues to hard bop and concert music for chamber groups and symphonic orchestra, he continued to write for singers, tour with his own small and large ensembles, and was now writing for television and motion pictures. He must have been delighted to work with Monk, but it was clear that this album was to be done quickly. Nelson's arrangements are very straightforward (theme, solos, out-chorus), written for four reeds, six brass, guitar, bass, drums, and Monk. The album was recorded in three three-hour sessions, two of which were done in one day. The album itself received little publicity, and did not last long in the catalog. Notes to the Conductor: As stated above, these arrangements are not complex and can be easily prepared for concerts and competitions. They can be opened up for any and all soloists, not just piano, trumpet and tenor sax. We have chosen to leave the instrumentation the way Nelson had it (4 reeds, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, guitar, piano, bass, drums); no optional parts have been added. When Nelson arranged these pieces, there were no lead sheets, so Monk played them for the arranger, who took them down. Several years ago, publisher Don Sickler prepared a folio of Monk lead sheets published by Thelonious Music and distributed by Hal Leonard; I was one of the editors who worked with Don. All melodies in these big band settings conform to the authorized versions of the compositions as published in the Monk fakebook. This arrangement is based on Oliver Nelson's original autograph score - this is not a transcription. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Little Rootie Tootie by The Thelonious Monk Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Oliver Nelson. For Big Band. Swing. Medium Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8367). Background: Thelonious Monk had gone from a quirky pianist/composer to international star, in many ways thanks to a Columbia Records recording contract that began in 1962. Like fellow jazz artists on the label such as Dave Brubeck and Miles Davis, worldwide distribution of his recordings resulted in important engagements and tours all over the globe. By 1968 however, Columbia Records was changing its focus with regard to jazz and popular music. The home of Tony Bennett, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis as well as Brubeck and Davis was now the home of Janis Joplin, Simon and Garfunkel, The Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, so Bennett, Mathis and company were now encouraged to modernize. Miles Davis was going in that direction anyway, so he would have little problem at the label in the years to come. Mathis and Williams went pop/rock by choosing their songs carefully and were quite successful. Bennett refused to be something he wasn't, and finished out his contract with no support from the label (one of the albums he made during this period was one of his finest, arranged and conducted by Robert Farnon; it was barely released in the U.S.). Brubeck just left the label. Thelonious Monk was in an unusual position at that time. He'd completed a problematic but successful international tour with an all-star octet/nonet, which was inexcusably not recorded by Columbia (some recordings from this tour are available on unauthorized CDs). He wasn't composing much new material, and Columbia wanted him to record songs written by the Beatles. His days were clearly numbered, but Columbia ended his contract with a bang: he made an album of his songs with big band. If anyone was a good fit to arrange the music of Thelonious Monk, (besides Hall Overton, arranger for Monk's appearances at Town Hall and Philharmonic Hall), it was Oliver Nelson. By 1968, Nelson was a resident of Los Angeles after spending many years as part of the New York jazz scene. A saxophonist who had a very wide musical range, from rhythm and blues to hard bop and concert music for chamber groups and symphonic orchestra, he continued to write for singers, tour with his own small and large ensembles, and was now writing for television and motion pictures. He must have been delighted to work with Monk, but it was clear that this album was to be done quickly. Nelson's arrangements are very straightforward (theme, solos, out-chorus), written for four reeds, six brass, guitar, bass, drums, and Monk. The album was recorded in three three-hour sessions, two of which were done in one day. The album itself received little publicity, and did not last long in the catalog. Notes to the Conductor: As stated above, these arrangements are not complex and can be easily prepared for concerts and competitions. They can be opened up for any and all soloists, not just piano, trumpet and tenor sax. We have chosen to leave the instrumentation the way Nelson had it (4 reeds, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, guitar, piano, bass, drums); no optional parts have been added. When Nelson arranged these pieces, there were no lead sheets, so Monk played them for the arranger, who took them down. Several years ago, publisher Don Sickler prepared a folio of Monk lead sheets published by Thelonious Music and distributed by Hal Leonard; I was one of the editors who worked with Don. All melodies in these big band settings conform to the authorized versions of the compositions as published in the Monk fakebook. This arrangement is based on Oliver Nelson's original autograph score - this is not a transcription. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Make It Good by The Duke Pearson Big Band. Arranged by Duke Pearson. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8009). Here is another fantastic arrangement from Duke Pearson. The original manuscript has been used to produce this arrangement - this is NOT a transcription. 'Make It Good' was recorded in 1968 on the 'Now Hear This' record for Blue Note and featured a cast of incredible players including Frank Foster, Marvin Stamm, Garnett Brown, Jerry Dodgion, Pepper Adams, Bob Cranshaw, and of course, pianist/arranger/conductor Duke Pearson. This up-tempo swing chart is will certainly bring out the best of your players. On the recording there is a tenor solo followed by a baritone sax solo. In the original manuscript there is a tenor part written in where the recorded solo happens. So, we have decided to retain the original tenor part and move that solo to an open solo section (which is also indicated in the manuscript). This is a little bit of an odd form consisting of a 16-bar section followed by a 14-bar section, making a 30-bar form. At the end of the tune there is a improvised cadenza by both the tenor and baritone saxophones. As is the case for all the Duke Pearson pro-level charts, the ranges are quite high - trumpet 1 goes to a high F# and trombone 1 goes to a high C. But, in several places that C is indicated as optional. There are no doubles in this chart. And, we have included an optional guitar part as there wasn't one in the original manuscript.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Ready When You Are C.B. by The Duke Pearson Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Duke Pearson. For Big Band. Swing. Medium. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8162). Here is a relatively easy arrangement from the 'Introducing the Duke Pearson Big Band' record from 1967. This was arranged as a tribute to Count Basie and features piano throughout. This also features solos for bass trombone and baritone saxophone. The recorded version features just piano but when the band performed live they used an augmented version of the chart that featured trombone and baritone solos. Part of Duke Pearson's piano solo (that we feel is integral) has been transcribed and is presented here as-played. Ranges: Trumpet 1 to F6; Trombone 1 to B flat 4.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Trinkle-Tinkle by The Thelonious Monk Big Band. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Oliver Nelson. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8368). Background: Thelonious Monk had gone from a quirky pianist/composer to international star, in many ways thanks to a Columbia Records recording contract that began in 1962. Like fellow jazz artists on the label such as Dave Brubeck and Miles Davis, worldwide distribution of his recordings resulted in important engagements and tours all over the globe. By 1968 however, Columbia Records was changing its focus with regard to jazz and popular music. The home of Tony Bennett, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis as well as Brubeck and Davis was now the home of Janis Joplin, Simon and Garfunkel, The Byrds and Paul Revere and the Raiders, so Bennett, Mathis and company were now encouraged to modernize. Miles Davis was going in that direction anyway, so he would have little problem at the label in the years to come. Mathis and Williams went pop/rock by choosing their songs carefully and were quite successful. Bennett refused to be something he wasn't, and finished out his contract with no support from the label (one of the albums he made during this period was one of his finest, arranged and conducted by Robert Farnon; it was barely released in the U.S.). Brubeck just left the label. Thelonious Monk was in an unusual position at that time. He'd completed a problematic but successful international tour with an all-star octet/nonet, which was inexcusably not recorded by Columbia (some recordings from this tour are available on unauthorized CDs). He wasn't composing much new material, and Columbia wanted him to record songs written by the Beatles. His days were clearly numbered, but Columbia ended his contract with a bang: he made an album of his songs with big band. If anyone was a good fit to arrange the music of Thelonious Monk, (besides Hall Overton, arranger for Monk's appearances at Town Hall and Philharmonic Hall), it was Oliver Nelson. By 1968, Nelson was a resident of Los Angeles after spending many years as part of the New York jazz scene. A saxophonist who had a very wide musical range, from rhythm and blues to hard bop and concert music for chamber groups and symphonic orchestra, he continued to write for singers, tour with his own small and large ensembles, and was now writing for television and motion pictures. He must have been delighted to work with Monk, but it was clear that this album was to be done quickly. Nelson's arrangements are very straightforward (theme, solos, out-chorus), written for four reeds, six brass, guitar, bass, drums, and Monk. The album was recorded in three three-hour sessions, two of which were done in one day. The album itself received little publicity, and did not last long in the catalog. Notes to the Conductor: As stated above, these arrangements are not complex and can be easily prepared for concerts and competitions. They can be opened up for any and all soloists, not just piano, trumpet and tenor sax. We have chosen to leave the instrumentation the way Nelson had it (4 reeds, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, guitar, piano, bass, drums); no optional parts have been added. When Nelson arranged these pieces, there were no lead sheets, so Monk played them for the arranger, who took them down. Several years ago, publisher Don Sickler prepared a folio of Monk lead sheets published by Thelonious Music and distributed by Hal Leonard; I was one of the editors who worked with Don. All melodies in these big band settings conform to the authorized versions of the compositions as published in the Monk fakebook. This arrangement is based on Oliver Nelson's original autograph score - this is not a transcription. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Unit 7 arranged by Duke Pearson. For Big Band. Swing/Latin. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8156). In addition to the two full-length records that the Duke Pearson Big Band recorded in the late 1960s, there were numerous other arrangements that didn't get recorded. This arrangement of Sam Jones' standard 'Unit 7' is one of those tunes that was performed live by the band but never recorded. This arrangement alternates between swing (for A sections) and Latin (for bridge) and features a trumpet solo (written for trumpet 4) and alto saxophone solo. Both solos have Duke's typical great backgrounds happening. Trumpet 1 goes to F6 and trombones 1 & 2 get to C5. There are no saxophone doubles. In addition, a guitar part is included. Ranges: Trumpet 1 to F6; Trombones 1 and 2 to C5.
$65.00

Genres: Latin, Swing, Jazz & Blues
Lover, Come Back To Me by As Written For Frank Sinatra with Count Basie. Arranged by Billy Byers. For Big Band with Male Vocal. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-9082). Here is a Billy Byers chart that was arranged for the 'Sinatra Live at the Sands' performance and recording with the Count Basie Orchestra. However, this arrangement was not used for that performance. We know it was written for that show as the date written on the manuscript is June 21, 1965, which corresponds to dates on other manuscripts that were used (Where Or When is marked June 20, 1965). And, Byers indicated that is was for 'Basie-Sinatra.' This arrangement has been produced directly from the original manuscript. This bluesy chart set in a medium swing tempo features some very nice triplet figures throughout. Trombones open with plungers and go back to them at the end of the arrangement. Similar to the other Sands arrangements there was an optional 5th trumpet part written for Harry 'Sweets' Edison that just included chord changes for background fills behind the vocal. There are no saxophone doubles or solos. The vocal key is F throughout. Ranges: Trumpet 1 to D6; Trombone 1 to C5 (optional) or A4; Vocal Key: F.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Jambangle by Gil Evans. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gil Evans. For Little Big Band (8 horns with rhythm section). Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8096). Jambangle was one of the earliest compositions by Evans after several years of arranging the music of others. He originally wrote the piece for the previously mentioned Jazz Workshop, led by Hal McKusick, and this version was recorded on April 6, 1956. Evans new version was recorded by Rudy Van Gelder on October 11, 1957. This Jazz Lines edition of Jambangle has been extensively re-edited using a photocopy of the original score in Evans hand. Please note that for this publication, the French horn part has a key signature on the score and part; Evans did not use one. Also please note that the piano part has been transcribed; it does not appear on the score. Bars 59-64 were missing chord names. Jambangle is an excellent example of Evans reworking a piece hed written some time before. This version uses many of the same ideas as the arrangement for McKusick, but is improved in every way here. As was usual with Evans, he took the opportunity to experiment, create problems for himself and then solve them as creatively as possible. According to Howard Johnson and Anita Evans, tubist Bill Barber was not available for this album, so Evans chose a bass trombone. He also used a bassoon instead of a baritone saxophone as a bass instrument (although here again, he also exploits the high range of the instrument; shades of Stravinskys Rite of Spring). At this point in his life, he was no longer using a five-person saxophone section anyway; the only saxophone on Miles Ahead, and Porgy and Bess was an alto sax; the rest of the reed section were three players who doubled on clarinets and flutes of various sizes. In a way, the instrumentation on Gil Evans & 10 is an elaboration of the one used for the Miles Davis Nonet. He used a similar instrumentation on his two World Pacific albums, and also the band he led at the Jazz Gallery in 1960. A concern is the blend of the group. The conductor must resist the temptation of making the bassoon play louder to fill up the bottom of the ensemble. It is clear that Evans wanted the bottom to be felt more than heard. Even though the alto sax is barely audible on the original tape, this part needs to be equal to the other two reeds. Please do not replace the soprano sax part with a clarinet. The five brass should balance well with a bit of practice. The out-chorus at Letter P is particularly challenging, as no one instrument should stick out over the trumpets who are quite low at some points. This piece can be opened up for more solos, and backgrounds reused at the conductors discretion. Also, we have included a tenor saxophone part as an alternate for the horn and a baritone saxophone part as an alternate for the bassoon. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Now's The Time edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Med Flory. For big band. Written for Supersax With Big Band. Jazz, Swing. Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8147). After almost forty years, these classic arrangements by Med Flory of Charlie Parker solos harmonized for five saxophones are available for students and professionals. The idea for celebrating the creativity of Parker goes back to 1956. According to Flory, he began transcribing the solos from a set of records that were sold to him by the alto saxophonist Joe Maini. He wrote three arrangements and Flory, Maini, Joe Kennedy, Richie Kamuca and Bill Hood ran them down for fun. Bassist Buddy Clark heard them and suggested Flory create a whole book of such solos. But it wasnt until the early 70s that Supersax really came together. Flory and company rehearsed in his home for over a year until Florys wife finally suggested that they play at a club in Los Angeles called Dontes. The reception was phenomenal, and the group soon made its first album, Supersax Plays Bird for Capitol Records. Supersax toured all over the world and has recorded nine albums to date; in 1974, one of them won a Grammy award. The original scores and parts (where available) were used as the main sources for these publications. Med Flory took the arrangement of Now's the Time that was recorded on the 1977 record 'Chasin' the Bird' and added brass parts so that it could be played by a big band. The original Supersax arrangement of Now's the Time as recorded is also available (JLP-8234). This big band version has not been recorded. The brass parts are not difficult but trumpet 1 does go to F#6.
$65.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues