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Bonehead by Lennie Niehaus. For jazz ensemble. Standard jazz ensemble. Kendor Jazz Archive Series. Swing. Advanced. Score and Set of Parts. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52112). Fashioned after the playing of J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding, this moderate swing original casts the trombone section in a variety of starring roles -- solis, trading 'fours' with the rest of the band, and a short ad lib solo. Some sax soli work and a short trumpet solo give the 'bones a chance to rest their chops before the chart goes out strong. Duration 3:50.
$75.00

Instruments: Trombone, Brass
Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Autumn In New York by Charlie Parker. Arranged by Joe Lipman. For big band with strings. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8016). Here is Joe Lipman's brilliant big band with strings arrangement that he did for Charlie Parker. This was recorded in 1952 and is presented here directly from the original manuscript. This is NOT a transcription. However, everything Parker played on this recording has been transcribed and presented here as-played, though we have also included (in a separate staff) what was originally written for him. So, this arrangement can certainly be played without the need to mimic Bird. This chart was scored for solo alto sax, 2 altos (both double flute), 2 tenors (both double clarinet and bass clarinet), baritone sax (doubles clarinet), 3 trumpets, 2 trombones, 4 violins, 2 violas, 2 celli, harp, guitar, piano, bass, and drums. The brass parts have been augmented to 4 trumpets and 4 trombones.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Bebop, Jazz & Blues, Jazz
Jeru by Claude Thornhill. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gerry Mulligan. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8418). Background: The period from 1948-9 was a time of experimenting and discovering for the young Gerald Mulligan. Encouraged by Gil Evans to move to New York, Mulligan not only became a mainstay at Evans 55th Street apartment, but acquired a mentor in Evans, who encouraged Mulligan by getting him work writing for the Claude Thornhill Orchestra. Mulligan was one of the group of musicians who developed and wrote for what would become the Miles Davis Nonet. Except for Venus De Milo, Mulligan not only arranged his own compositions for the small ensemble, but wrote versions of them for big bands led by Thornhill or fellow Philadelphian Elliot Lawrence. Thornhill clearly liked Mulligans music; his band was still playing it in the late 1950s.The Music: The original score for Jeru was unavailable for reference; in fact, the Mulligan estate obtained copies of the parts from a 'friend' who wanted to do Mulligan a favor (several Thornhill arrangements were loaned out for a concert and never returned; copies of these circulated underground for years). I wrote out a score from these parts that I donated to the estate. In preparing this edition, I consulted the original parts anew as if Id never prepared the earlier score. One of the key issues to be dealt with was Mulligans use of chord names. He had shared with me that he was not writing vertically during the period in question, but horizontally. When writing chord names for the rhythm instruments, he was not as clear about alterations to chords as he would be years later. Jeru is pure counterpoint, and Mulligans chord names are either simplified or substitutions that did not represent the harmony accurately. The chord names in this publication have been extensively reviewed and corrected. When Jerome Klinkowitz wrote about Jeru in his book Listen: Gerry Mulligan An Aural Narrative in Jazz (N.Y., Schirmer Books, 1991), he criticized the form of the arrangement based on Thornhills 1953 recording for Trend Records. What he did not know was that two cuts were made for time purposes: bars 103-4 (the first ending of Letter K), and then from 107-117. As a result, his conclusions are inaccurate. This reinforces yet again the importance of seeking out first-hand sources when writing about a composers music, in this case the original score and/or parts. Alternate parts have been added so that this arrangement may be played by a standard big band with 4 trumpets and 4 trombones. 4th trumpet and trombone parts are alternates for horns 1 and 2. However, we encourage you to play this arrangement as-written without those alternate parts.Notes to the Conductor: As stated above, Mulligan was writing by line and not thinking in chordal structures and chord names in 1948-9; he certainly was not boxed in by them. I suggest that you play or sing through each instrumental line, and then play them against the other pitches to observe the shapes of the lines, and then to see how they fit in with everything else. Like Evans music from the same period, there are numerous examples of subtle dissonances or grinds which go by so fast that the listener is hardly aware of them. Mulligan was particularly concerned with the proper tempos of his pieces. The big band version of Jeru was recorded in New York while he was on the west coast, but he never objected to it as he would other performances/recordings of his music. Please do not rush the piece; let it flow easily. Please note that on the recording, there is a conga playing in the rhythm section. A part for this instrument was never written by Mulligan, and it should not be added for authenticity.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Swing, Smooth Jazz, Jazz
Robbins' Nest by Claude Thornhill. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gil Evans. For Big Band. Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8097). Background: Some of the most well-known arrangements of modern jazz from the mid-1940s (commonly called bebop, although most of the musicians playing the music disliked the term) were written for the Claude Thornhill Orchestra by its musical director, Gil Evans. Robbins Nest, while not strictly a bebop line, nevertheless remains popular with jazz musicians, and Evans setting of it is one more classic in post-war big band music. For many years, Evans music was at the top of pretty much any band directors wish list as music they wanted their students to play and study. We are delighted to make this music available in the best possible editions. The Music: Robbins Nest was written by tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet and pianist Sir Charles Thompson, and they recorded the piece in May of 1947. Lyrics were added by Bob Russell, and this version is known as Just When Were Falling In Love. The piece was subsequently recorded by many artists, including the orchestras of Claude Thornhill and Count Basie. Another version was waxed by the excellent Sam Donahue Orchestra, and this record was as close to a hit as Donahue had; Donahue was still playing it on the road with his orchestra ten years later. Robbins Nest was named after the radio program of the same name hosted by well-known media personality Fred Robbins (1919-1992) in New York City, heard on various stations over the years. Robbins was all over radio and television as a variety show and quiz show host, actor, and writer. In 1947, he was primarily known as a modern jazz DJ, and the newest records were heard on his program. Please note that this arrangement was recorded for Columbia Records and for radio transcriptions. The Columbia recording has a cut from bars 60-66 because of time; all transcriptions are complete and are easy to find on CD. Notes to the Conductor: If I were asked to name a piece where it seemed like the ensemble was going to explode but never does, I would immediately think of this arrangement. The Thornhill Orchestra was known as an ensemble that featured extreme contrasts in dynamics, from very soft to loud (Thornhill gave interviews about how he admired the Glenn Miller Orchestra for its dynamic control, and how he sought to imitate it). Although there are some sections of Robbins Nest that are moderately loud to very loud, the key to the success of this arrangement is softness; the ability to play very relaxed yet softly at the same time, which is seldom asked for in the music many big bands study and play today. This is the perfect piece to practice such an approach. Additionally, some of the voicings are highly dissonant and demand perfect intonation. Grinds of half-steps against each other (F# against G natural, Db against C, often in the same instruments) are an Evans trademark in all his music, from Thornhill to the classic Miles Davis albums Miles Ahead and Porgy and Bess (he even asks for quarter tones in the trombones in some settings), and musicians must get used to them, even though they may have encountered them previously in the music of Maria Schneider and Bob Brookmeyer. Here they are used in a popular music vein vs. composition. I have resisted the temptation to put excessive articulation in the parts, as Ive found that in doing so, it can tend to be exaggerated in performance. Evans music must be played many times so that musicians get every last nuance he put into it, and in doing so, you and the band will find your way toward a performance that everyone will be comfortable playing and hearing. Jeffrey Sultanof -February 2010.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Swing, Smooth Jazz, Jazz
Blues For Pablo by Miles Davis with The Gil Evans Orchestra. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gil Evans. For jazz ensemble (jazz orchestra). Swing. Difficult. Full score and set of parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8109). [From this edition's notes by Jeffrey Sultanof] Blues for Pablo was originally written for Hal McKusick for inclusion on his Jazz Workshop LP recorded in 1956 for RCA Victor Records (this album also included Jambangle, which was later re-orchestrated and expanded for Evans' Big Stuff LP for Prestige Records). Evans mixes an idea in minor that has two influences (a theme from de Falla's ballet El Sombrero de Tres Picos and a Mexican folk song) with a blues in major, and the effect is pure Gil Evans. His treatment of this piece for Davis' album is identical in form to the McKusick version, but is in a different key, and of course is set for a larger ensemble. Despite a large brass ensemble of five trumpets, four trombones (including a bass trombone) and tuba, he used four reeds, of which only one was a saxophone. The other reeds are flutes and bass clarinet. Please note that there is no piano part for this arrangement, and none should be added. This edition hues closely to what Evans originally wrote as we have used the original score as the basis; the only changes are corrections of wrong notes. Don't let anyone tell you that maestro Evans did not make mistakes in his manuscripts; he most certainly did. So an editor must look carefully to make sure that what is finally published is in fact what the composer wanted. This is made easier because Evans' voicings are based on instrumental doublings, so checking say, the bass clarinet and bass trombone against each other usually solves any note questions, as well as listening to the recording. Obviously, consultation of the original parts would be helpful to aid in this pursuit. However, the original parts are currently unavailable.
$75.00

Genres: Classical, Blues, Swing, Jazz & Blues
When Lights Are Low by Benny Carter. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. For big band. Jazz, Swing. Medium. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8460). Background: In 1935, Carter left the United States to play and write in Europe, and his presence there had an immediate effect on European jazz and dance musicians. After staying in France for nine months, Carter accepted an invitation to arrange for the BBC Dance Orchestra under the direction of Henry Hall, and while he could not play with the orchestra because of British music union rules, he could play on a series of recordings contracted by the Vocalion (UK) label. The Music: On June 20, 1936, Carter and a quartet (which included Americans Gene Rodgers and Bernard Addison) made the first recording of 'When Lights Are Low' with a vocal by fellow expatriate, vocalist Elisabeth Welch (lyrics were written by Spencer Williams). The first recording of the song for big band was recorded in Holland by the Kai Ewans Orchestra, and the song became the band's theme. Carter took the vocal himself on this recording. 'When Lights Are Low' is Carter's most popular song, recorded many times over the years. Perhaps the most famous version was made by Miles Davis in 1953, who unfortunately used a different bridge than the one Carter wrote, and this 'bridge' has been recorded many times in error. The arrangement presented here was first performed by an all-star big band led by Carter for a concert at Princeton University on December 3, 1973. The parts reveal that Carter made quite a few changes over many performances of this setting; there are cross-outs, paste-overs and rewrites in pencil by several hands. This is the final version of Carter's arrangement. Notes to the Conductor: Benny Carter's arrangements are models of taste, economy and they warrant study by students and professionals alike. They are almost Mozartean with regard to voice-leading and clarity, with not one wasted note. Many have saxophone soli for which Carter was well-known. 'When Lights Are Low' is not difficult and can even be played by many Middle School bands. But like Mozart, this music does present challenges that can test a professional ensemble. The sax soli must sound like one person, and since the baritone saxophone doubles the first alto, both players should practice together to master the intonation challenges in the high register. Articulation should be followed exactly, and the piece should not be played too fast. Finally, please make the distinction between the swing eighth and the dotted eighth-sixteenth figures, but such figures should not sound overly exaggerated. There are no saxophone doubles.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Sleep by Benny Carter. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Benny Carter. For big band. Jazz, Swing. Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8463). Background: In 1940, Benny Carter was acknowledged by the music press to be one of the leading lights on the American big band scene. Several bandleaders had his music in their books, and Benny led his own big band, touring and making records. Unfortunately, Carters band never really caught on despite the fine music it played, partly because it did not have a hit record, but also because Carter himself was not a flashy soloist such as Harry James and Jimmy Dorsey (Carter played and soloed on alto saxophone and trumpet). That did not mean that he wasn't an excellent soloist; he most certainly was, but he was appreciated more by musicians than the public at large. The Music: Sleep (composed and published in 1923 by Earl Lebieg) was then known as the theme for Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians; Waring began as a bandleader and eventually formed the top choral organization in the United States, with his own radio (and later television) show. Waring was almost totally responsible for the school choral movement beginning in the late forties. He continued to tour, record and give choral workshops until his death in 1984. Sleep was composed as a waltz, but in Carters hands, it becomes an ensemble tour-de-force. In our opinion, it is not only a masterpiece, but is one of the finest arrangements of a song in the history of the big bands. Carter transforms Sleep into a challenging and exciting presentation that really puts a band through its paces. 1972, Carter updated and slightly simplified the original arrangement for an all-star ensemble performance at the Newport Jazz Festival in New York. This became the official version of the arrangement, and Carter would play it with students and professionals all over the world. It is the only one authorized by the Carter estate. Notes to the Conductor: During the mid 1940s, Carters band performed this arrangement at such a blisteringly fast tempo that the band could just barely play the figures properly. Carters biographer and close friend Ed Berger asked him about these performances when he was preparing the two-volume bio-discography of Carter (Scarecrow Press). How did the tempo get so fast? Benny was surprised upon hearing airchecks many years after the fact, and gave the comment: Maybe it was the war. This setting makes an equally effective opener or closer or a terrific festival piece.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Charlie's Other Aunt by Charlie Barnet. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Manny Albam. For big band. Jazz, Swing. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8312). Here is Manny Albam's great fast-swinging arrangement of Charlie's Other Aunt. This arrangement was recorded twice in 1949 and both recordings featured a tenor sax solo. The first recording has Charlie Barnet playing the solo; the second featured Dick Hafer taking the solo. Both versions roll along briskly at about 150 per half note. However, we have reason to believe that Albam preferred the slightly slower tempo that it was recorded at in 1958. So, we've indicated a range of 120 to 150 for the half note. This arrangement was written for 5 trumpets and 3 trombones. We have included an optional 4th trombone part that is an alternate for the 5th trumpet so that this may be played by a band with the standard instrumentation. This arrangement features solo spots for piano, tenor saxophone, trombone, and trumpets 2 and 5 (or trombone 4 instead of trumpet 5). For the recording 24 bars of the piano solo was omitted. We have put these bars back in to lengthen the piano solo to match Manny's original conception. This is a great Manny Albam arrangement that will really showcase the band for a festival or concert. Ranges: Trumpet 1: E6; Trumpet 4: G6; Trombone 1: C5; Trombone 4: C5.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Joost At The Roost edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gerry Mulligan. For big band. Written for Claude Thornhill. Jazz, Swing. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8125). (From the notes by Jeffrey Sultanof) Background: The period from 1948-49 was a period of tremendous growth for Gerry Mulligan. Living in New York City right in the thick of modern jazz pioneers and innovators, Mulligan was encouraged and mentored by Gil Evans, who got him work writing for Claude Thornhill (Mulligan was also writing for fellow Philadelphian Elliot Lawrence, whom he'd worked with before he joined Gene Krupa in 1946). Mulligan became one of the main architects of the Miles Davis Nonet, contributing several arrangements and compositions to the ensemble. The Music: Joost at the Roost was written for both the nonet and the Thornhill big band. The score for the nonet is lost, but all of the parts exist and were the basis for the publication of this composition in the folio of nonet music published by Hal Leonard in 2000. A newly edited and corrected version was published by Jazzlines Publications in 2010. The big band score is dated October 20, 1948. Whereas the nonet version is fairly straightforward as a vehicle for solos (although the out-chorus has some similarities with the Thornhill version), the big band version is an ambitious composition that combines Mulligans continued exploration of contrapuntal ensemble writing and use of time-signature changes as in Jeru. But what is striking is that as early as 1948, Mulligan shows in this score that he had already formulated a concept to turn the big band into an extended small group, with linear give-and-take as in his small group with Chet Baker, and a lighter ensemble approach to orchestration. In fact, it was the only score from this era to be included in the Concert Jazz Band book twelve years later, the two French horn parts transposed to create a third trombone part. It was recorded for Verve Records in July, 1961, but was never issued and apparently rejected; the master no longer exists. Notes to the Conductor: When I was preparing the initial nonet publication of Joost at the Roost, Gerry Mulligan had already passed away, and he and I never had an opportunity to discuss this piece; Id never even heard of it before. There was no tempo listing anywhere, and I decided to contact bassist Bill Crow, who'd recorded the piece with the Concert Jazz Band. Bill came back with a tempo of quarter note = 144. When the Dutch Jazz Orchestra recorded Joost on their 2008 CD Moon Dreams: Rediscovered Music of Gil Evans and Gerry Mulligan (Challenge) the tempo was a bit faster than this. Although it must be said that the tempos on this CD are faster than the Thornhill recordings, this is not meant as a criticism. These performances are excellent and offer a different view of this music. With the knowledge that Mulligan generally did not like his music played very fast, the director must decide how he/she hears this music and can then select a tempo. Between the time changes and the two-beat triplets, realizing a relaxed performance of this piece can be a challenge. Rehearsal at a slow tempo after letter H is recommended so that everything falls into place and the piece sounds spontaneous.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Lonely Moments by Mary Lou Williams. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. For big band. Written for Duke Ellington. Jazz, Swing. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8776). Mary Lou Williams left Andy Kirk's band in May of 1942, and traveled with her husband, trumpeter Shorty Baker, who was a member of Duke Ellington's band. She composed and arranged quite a few pieces for Ellington, including an arrangement of 'Blue Skies' that was recorded at Carnegie Hall (for some unknown reason Ellington introduced the piece as 'Trumpets No End'). She also composed several other pieces that were not recorded including Aries Mood (Ben Webster feature), Scorpio, and this arrangement of Lonely Moments, a version of which was recorded by Benny Goodman. Recently this arrangement has been recorded by the Dutch Jazz Orchestra on their tribute to Mary Lou Williams. We are not entirely sure why this arrangement wasn't recorded when it was written, but our guess is that it was a bit 'modern' sounding even for Duke Ellington. This is a great arrangement that features solos for trumpet and tenor saxophone.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Scorpio by Mary Lou Williams. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. For big band. Written for Duke Ellington. Jazz, Ballad. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8775). Mary Lou Williams left Andy Kirk's band in May of 1942, and traveled with her husband, trumpeter Shorty Baker, who was a member of Duke Ellington's band. She composed and arranged quite a few pieces for Ellington, including an arrangement of 'Blue Skies' that was recorded at Carnegie Hall (for some unknown reason Ellington introduced the piece as 'Trumpets No End'). She also composed several other pieces that were not recorded including Aries Mood (Ben Webster feature), Lonely Moments (a version was recorded by Benny Goodman), and this arrangement of Scorpio, written in 1946. Recently this arrangement has been recorded by the Dutch Jazz Orchestra and the Jazz Ambassadors on their tributes to Mary Lou Williams. We are not entirely sure why this arrangement wasn't recorded when it was written, but our guess is that it was a bit 'modern' sounding even for Duke Ellington. Please note that this arrangement is not the piano piece from The Zodiac Suite that Mary Lou Williams had written at the same time. Around the same time she composed The Zodiac Suite she took some of the motivic material from the Scorpio movement and fleshed it out into a full big band arrangement to feature Jimmy Hamilton and Lawrence Brown of the Ellington band.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
My Ship by Miles Davis. Edited by Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Gil Evans. For big band. Jazz. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-8148).
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
The Pursuit Of The Lady In The Feathered Hat (with Tutor CD) by Joe Zawinul. Arranged by DeLucia. For marching percussion ensemble (Snare, Tenor Drums, Cymbals, Bass Drums, Bells, Xylophone, Marimba, Vibes, (4) Timpani, Triangle, Tambourine, Sleigh Bells, Low Tom, Maracas, (3) Roto Toms, Agogo Bells, Hi Hat). Indiana State Solo & Ensemble List. Grade 5. Score, parts & tutor CD. Duration 1:35. Published by Row-Loff Publications (RF.9312-WTCD).
$75.00

Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Drums, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone
Genres: Jazz & Blues
Central Park North by Thad Jones. For jazz ensemble; saxes double on soprano sax (1st Alto), clarinet (2nd Alto & tenors), and bass clarinet (bari); 4th Trumpet doubles on flugelhorn. Standard jazz ensemble; saxes double on soprano sax (1st Alto), clarinet (2nd Alto & tenors), and bass clarinet (bari); 4th Trumpet doubles on flugelhorn. Kendor Archive Editions. Hard rock-ballad. Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52150). As recorded by the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra on their album of the same name, this classic chart features an ABA schematic -- it opens and closes in a driving hard rock style with a contrasting slow ballad interlude between. Solos are given to alto and soprano sax, flugelhorn, and trumpet, with an unaccompanied, expandable solo for the drummer just before the final recap. Duration 9:14.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Hard Rock, Rock
Footprints by Wayne Shorter. Arranged by Matthew Harris. For jazz ensemble; 1st Alto Sax doubles on soprano. Standard jazz ensemble; 1st Alto Sax doubles on soprano. Kendor Archive Editions. Jazz waltz. Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52323). This setting of the classic Wayne Shorter tune features open solos for piano, bass or guitar, and tenor sax. When played with good intonation and balance, tight harmonies in the horn parts will yield impressive results, especially when supported by a sensitive rhythm section. The sound of muted brass is another nice touch here. Duration 5:10.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
Maids Of Cadiz by Charles Evans. For jazz ensemble, features trumpet. Features trumpet; standard jazz ensemble. Kendor Archive Editions. Ballad. Medium. Score and parts. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52529). Recorded by Miles Davis on his iconic album Miles Ahead (Columbia) and arranged by the great Gil Evans, this moody ballad featuring trumpet throughout is not a technical showpiece, but rather requires expressive sophistication from everyone for best results.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
Tribute by Bob Mintzer. For jazz ensemble; tenor saxes have optional flute doubles. Standard jazz ensemble; tenor saxes have optional flute doubles. Kendor Archive Editions. Basie Style Swing. Medium Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52940). Recorded by the Bob Mintzer Big Band on the album Incredible Journey, this laidback Basie excursion starts with a 32-bar (expandable) piano solo backed by bass and drums before the ensemble joins in. Trumpet and trombone carry additional solos, the full-group writing is exceptional, and the ending has a big, full sound. Duration 10:30.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Values by Neil Slater. Arranged by Neil Slater. For jazz ensemble (5-5-5-5). Jazz Masters series. Concert Jazz. Grade 5. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-1094). Neil Slater has created a marvelous composition. It can be heard on Lab '91, as recorded by the University of North Texas One O' Clock Lab Band. "Values" opens with a stirring, slow theme and then moves into a 6/8 section that evolves into a marvelous fugue for the wind sections. This leads into the improvised tenor saxophone solo (a bright 4/4). The full ensemble takes over for a while, leading to a return to 6/8 for a trumpet solo. The piece then returns to the slow, gorgeous ending. Neil is one of the world's most accomplished jazz ensemble composers. 5-5-5-5.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
The Daily Dance by Bill Holman. Arranged by Bill Holman. For jazz ensemble (5-5-5-3). Stan Kenton series. Fast Swing. Grade 5-6. Score and set of parts. Published by Sierra Music (S1.SMP-1095). "The Daily Dance" was recorded by the Stan Kenton Orchestra on the CD "Birthday in Britain." The piece is a very fast-swing that features solos for alto saxophone, trumpet, piano (written) and drums. This is one of the many Bill Holman masterpieces he created for the Kenton Band. It does require a mature band and a good amount of rehearsal. All the work put in will be well rewarded with performance of this terrific piece. Well done, Willis! 5-5-5-3.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Switching Gears by Lars Halle. For jazz ensemble plus 5th trumpet. Kendor Archive Editions. Swing. Medium. Score and set of parts. Duration 2 minutes, 30 seconds. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52900). Momentum must be maintained at the designated tempo (quarter note = 240) to achieve the excitement that's intended in this dynamic original. Highlights include solos for trumpet and tenor, and rousing section solis for saxes and brass. Duration 2:30.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Waltz You "Swang" For Me by Jones. For standard jazz ensemble; 1st Alto has opt. double on soprano. Kendor Archive Editions. Jazz Waltz. Advanced. Score and set of parts. Duration ca. 5 minutes, 15 seconds. Published by Kendor Music Inc (KN.52975). As recorded by the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra for their Monday Night album, the opening rhythm section vamp sets the stage for the entrance of the featured soprano (or alto) sax soloist. With the exception of an expandable solo for piano midway through and some great full-band choruses, the soloist carries the day here. The chart closes out strong with a series of improvised solo cadenzas. Duration ca. 5:15.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues
Christmas Waltz by Rob McConnell and The Boss Brass. Arranged by Rob McConnell. For big band. Bossa Nova/Swing/Ballad, Jazz. Difficult. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-7015). Here is one of the classic holiday arrangements as written by the great arranger/trombonist Rob McConnell. Featured on the 1998 Concord album Big Band Christmas, this arrangement was written to feature trumpeter Guido Basso (on flugelhorn). The arrangement begins in a light Bossa feel with reeds stating the melody. The chart then moves to a medium swing feel for the second chorus. The first part of the flugelhorn solo section was written as a colla voce in 3/4, with guitar, bass, and drums following the soloist. The arrangement stays in 3/4 until the end. Reeds double on flute, clarinet, soprano saxophone, and bass clarinet (see below). This would be a great addition to any holiday program. Ranges: Trumpet 1: to C7, Trumpet 2: to A6, Trombone 1: G4.
$75.00

Genres: Bossa nova, Christmas, Swing, Latin, Miscellaneous, Jazz & Blues
Just One Of Those Things by Rob McConnell and The Boss Brass. Edited by Rob DuBoff and Jeffrey Sultanof. Arranged by Rob McConnell. For big band. Swing, Jazz. Advanced. Score and parts. Published by Jazz Lines Publications (JL.JLP-7041). Well, what can you say about Rob McConnell's writing that hasn't already been said? His writing is consistently interesting, surprising, and swinging. This arrangement is a perfect example of why he was one of the most important writers of the second half of the 20th Century. He takes the Cole Porter standard Just One of Those Things and turns it on its head. For the first chorus Rob took an improvised solo and harmonized it for the reeds (ala Supersax). The arrangement drops down to half time with some nice swinging figures until it gradually starts to accelerate back to tempo I. This accelerando section (16 bars) will be tricky for any band to pull off but is an amazing effect. This arrangement features solos for trumpet 5 and trombone 5 (those parts were written for Guido Basso and McConnell himself). There is no getting around the fact that this arrangement will require work from even the most experienced bands. There are reed doubles, some meter changes, tempo changes, and high range notes for brass. But, if you have the time and players this would be a standout piece for any festival or concert Ranges: Trumpet 1: to E6, Trumpet 2: to C6, Trombone 1: to Bb4.
$75.00

Genres: Swing, Jazz & Blues
Entropical Paradise by Eric Richards. For jazz ensemble (trumpet and trombone solos). This edition: Trumpet range to E6. Latin Groove, Afro-Cuban, Jazz. Eric Richards Series. Level 5. Score and set of parts. Published by UNC Jazz Press (NC.1103). (9 Brass) (Level 5) This tour de force is one of Eric's finest compositions. A very challenging chart featuring both trumpet and trombone solos. A songo type feel alternating with another Latin groove. Challenging changes--a chart for only strong bands. Recorded on UNC's Alive XV.
$75.00

Genres: Jazz & Blues, Latin