Sheet music search made easy
Search within results:
Delivery Method
Instruments
Genres
Price
Classical
307 result(s) found
List results in: Detailed View | Thumbnail View
Sort results by: Price | Release Date | Popularity | Title
Results per page: 10 | 24 | 50
Kick. (for eleven players). By Steve Martland (1959-). For 3 saxophones (STBar), trumpet, trombone, piano, marimba, percussion, violin, electric guitar and bass guitar). This edition: ED 12589. Scores. Study score. Composed 1996. 60 pages. Duration 8 minutes. Published by Schott Music (SD.49003266). ISBN 9790220119552.
$41.95

Pages: 60
Instruments: Piano, Saxophone, Violin, B-Flat Trumpet, Trombone, Bass Guitar, Electric Guitar, Percussion, Marimba, Piano and Keyboard, Woodwinds, Strings, Trumpet, Brass, Guitar
Genres: 20th Century, Classical
Horses of Instruction by Steve Martland (1959-). For 3 saxophones (ATBar), trumpet (B-flat), trombone, piano, marimba, percussion, violin, electric guitar, bass guitar. This edition: ED 12482. Scores. Study score. Composed 1994. 102 pages. Duration 17 minutes. Published by Schott Music (SD.49003232). ISBN 9790220119217.
$47.95

Pages: 102
Instruments: Saxophone, Violin, B-Flat Trumpet, Trombone, Bass Guitar, Electric Guitar, Percussion, Marimba, Woodwinds, Strings, Trumpet, Brass, Guitar
Genres: 20th Century, Classical
Musik fur Mallets. (14 Duos und Soli). By Klaus Hinrich Stahmer (1941-). For 2 mallet instruments (Vibraphone, Marimba, xylophone). This edition: BAT 23. Drums/Percussion. A battere. Playing score. 34 pages. Published by Schott Music (SD.49000663). ISBN 9790001004831. 14 Duos und Soli fur Mallettinstrumente (Vibraphon, Marimbaphon, Xylophon, Stabspiele).
$16.95

Pages: 34
Instruments: Percussion, Drums, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone
Genres: 20th Century, Classical
Three Preludes by Claude Debussy (1862-1918). Arranged by David Reeves. Percussion trio. For 1 vibraphone, 1 marimba (low A), 4 timpani, crotales (3 players). Concert Percussion Ensembles. "Bruyeres," "Des Pas," and "General Lavine" arranged for percussion trio. Advanced. Score and parts. 16 pages. Duration 3'00" per mvt.. Published by Tapspace Publications (TA.TSPCE-09). These beautiful arrangements capture the essence of Debussy's most endearing famous piano preludes. A "chamber" piece in the truest sense, these preludes are written for three performers, and requires the utmost in musical sensitivity. Performers will have to maintain a strong command in understanding when the phrases will ebb and flow. Included are: Bruyeres - Prelude No. V from book II. Des pas sur la neige - Prelude No. VI from book I. General Lavine - Prelude No. VI from book II.
$35.00

Pages: 16
Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone
Genres: Impressionism, 20th Century, Classical
Alborada del Gracioso by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937). Arranged by James Ancona. Percussion Ensemble. For Glockenspiel, 3 marimbas (low A), xylophone, crotales, 3 vibraphones, 5 timpani, sizzle cymbal, snare drum, castanets, crotales, triangle, hi-hat crash cymbals, suspended cymbal, tambourine, Zildjian crash of doom, bass drum, tam tam (9 players). Percussion Feature. Marching Band. Advanced. Full score and CD-Rom (containing printable parts). 28 pages. Duration 4'00". Published by Tapspace Publications (TA.TSPCE-08). This percussion ensemble arrangement of "Alborada del Gracioso" recreates the colorful and vibrant work of Ravel's original. Originally written in 2001 and premiered by the Santa Clara Vanguard percussion ensemble, this arrangement will challenge performers and engage audiences with its accessible Spanish flair. The middle section features a soloistic marimba cadenza which utilizes advanced 4-mallet rotations and is answered by colorfully scored ensemble interjections.
$45.00

Pages: 28
Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Glockenspiel
Genres: Impressionism, 20th Century, Classical
Mercury by Gustav Holst (1874-1934). Arranged by James Ancona. Percussion Ensemble. For 2 glockenspiels, 2 xylophones, 2 vibraphones, 2 marimbas (low A), 5 timpani, small suspended cymbal, 2 triangles (10 players). Percussion Feature. Marching Band. Medium. Full score and CD-Rom (containing printable parts). 16 pages. Duration 2'00". Published by Tapspace Publications (TA.TSPCE-07). In Ancona's arrangement of "Mercury" from Holst's masterpiece "The Planets," the percussion ensemble re-creates the playful and rhythmic character of the original orchestration. Originally performed in 1996 in Star of Indiana's "Brass Theatre," "Mercury" is a harmonically complex piece yet very listenable at the same time. It requires ten players and relies on clever, integrated scoring to achieve its overall sound. Fun for performers, and accessible to audiences.
$35.00

Pages: 16
Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Glockenspiel
Genres: 20th Century, Classical
The Miraculous Mandarin by Bela Bartok (1881-1945). Arranged by James Ancona. Percussion Ensemble. For Glockenspiel, 3 marimbas (low A), xylophone, crotales, 3 vibraphones, 5 timpani, large tam tam, chimes, 2 china cymbals, 18" suspended cymbal, 4 toms, wind gong, medium gong, 2 small gongs of different sizes, dark sus. cym., bright sus. cym., sizzle cym., (8 players). Percussion Feature. Marching Band. Advanced. Score and parts. 36 pages. Duration 4'00". Published by Tapspace Publications (TA.TSPCE-04). This percussion ensemble arrangement of "The Miraculous Mandarin" is based upon three movements of Bartok's original work. The Beginning - A challenging display of technique, timbral variety, and creative orchestration. The Second Seduction - Featuring the vibraphones, this movement creates a rubato, tense beauty. The Chase - A relentless conclusion which drives to the ultimate point of release. This arrangement will challenge performers, and offers a programmatic piece which will showcase the versatility of the percussion ensemble's timbral range. It was first performed by the Santa Clara Vanguard Percussion Ensemble in 2000.
$45.00

Pages: 36
Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Glockenspiel
Genres: 20th Century, Hungarian, Classical, World
The Devil's Dance (from Histoire du Soldat). By Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). Arranged by James Ancona. Percussion Ensemble. For Glockenspiel, xylophone, 2 vibraphones, 2 marimbas (low A), 5 timpani, and multi-percussion (bass drum, snare drum, field drum, tambourine) (8 players). Concert Percussion Ensembles. Advanced. Score and parts. 16 pages. Duration 1'20". Published by Tapspace Publications (TA.TSPCE-02). "The Devil's Dance" is a short animated movement from Stravinsky's famous theatrical work Histoire du Soldat. Originally written by Stravinsky for a small instrumental theater ensemble of two woodwinds, two brass, two strings, and one solo percussionist, Ancona has preserved the original intent of this piece in a concert percussion setting of eight players. Meter changes occur frequently while constantly shifting accents and dissonant harmonies give it a sinister and sarcastic tone.
$31.00

Pages: 16
Instruments: Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Glockenspiel
Genres: 20th Century, Russian, Classical, World
Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Percussion Orchestra (Marimba Feature). By Gillingham. Arranged by Nathan Daughtrey. For Solo with Percussion Ensemble (Solo Marimba (5-octave), Bells/Crotales, Xylophone/Chimes, Vibraphone 1 (3-octave), Vibraphone 2 (3-octave), Marimba 1 (4-octave), Marimba 2 (4-octave), Marimba 3 (4.3-octave), Marimba 4 (5-octave), Piano, Timpani, Percussion 1 (brake drum, tambourine, su). Percussion Music. Difficult. Score and parts. Duration 23:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11855). The "Concerto No. 2 for Marimba" is a commission by a consortium of schools and performers headed by Professor Marc Wooldridge of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa. The chamber ensemble version, arranged for a double quintet (woodwind and brass) with three percussion and piano, was premiered on April 6, 2008 by Andrew Dancy.The work exploits the full range of the technical and expressive ability of the five-octave concert grand marimba. It is cast in the standard three-movement format. The first movement uses sonata-rondo form and begins with a slow introduction and quasi-cadenza by the marimba. An animated first theme follows in G-minor accompanied by clarinets and tambourine. A contrasting second theme area follows featuring chromatic mediant progressions and descending chromatic lines. The return of the first theme utilizes a slightly different accompaniment. The development section reworks all the thematic material in different guises. The recapitulation presents the first theme, verbatim, as it was in the exposition. The second theme, however, changes the mode to major. The return alternates the marimba on the theme with the winds playing the theme in augmentation. The marimba quietly ends the movement with an ascending and descending arpeggiated passage.The second movement is a chaconne with eight variations. The marimba states a rather haunting chorale-like melody in Bb minor. The first variation features the low brass on the chaconne theme with the marimba on the variation. Variation II uses marimba, clarinet, bells, and vibraphone and Variation III uses marimba, oboe, and horns. Cascading muted brass against the augmented chaconne theme in the flutes and clarinets are indicative of Variation IV. Variation V changes the slow pace to fast using marimba, brass, timpani, and bells. A haunting Variation VI utilizes bowed marimba on the chaconne theme accompanied by piano and bells. Variation VII features the low brass on the chaconne theme against triplets in the upper brass. Rolled arpeggiated chords highlight Variation VIII along with a solo alto saxophone on the second half of the variation. A somber coda brings the movement to a close.The third movement, like the first, is in sonata-rondo design and is cyclic, bringing back and combining the thematic material of the first and second movements. The first theme, in D-minor, is angular and spirited, accompanied by clarinets and tambourine (reminiscent of Mvt. I). The second theme brings back the second theme of the first movement followed by the return of the first theme, now accompanied by saxophones and tambourine. The development combines and works thematic material from all three movements of the concerto. The recapitulation begins with the bassoons on the first theme, followed by the horns/trumpets and finally, the marimba. The second theme brings back the chaconne of the second movement, this time in major with the marimba accompanying using rhythmic material taken from the first theme of the third movement. There is no formal return of the first theme. Instead, the marimba plays a cadenza in which the first theme material and the second movement chaconne are developed. A galloping presto (coda) follows, ending the movement in D major.- David R. GillinghamPRAISE FOR THE CONCERTO"The new Concerto for Marimba by David Gillingham is an intriguing, engaging, and challenging piece. I had so much fun playing it and I am planning to perform it everywhere!! It is a "must-try" for all marimbists!"She-e Wuworld-renowned solo marimba artist"Nathan Daughtry's percussion ensemble transcription of my Concerto for Marimba is absolutely masterful! Mr. Daughtrey has used a multitude of percussion colors to faithfully emulate the colors of the wind ensemble in a wonderful version of the concerto that will be accessible to fine percussion ensembles throughout the world."David R. Gillingham composer.
$80.00

Instruments: Piano, Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Piano and Keyboard
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Orchestra by Gillingham. Arranged by Nathan Daughtrey. For Soloist(s) with Full Orchestra (Piccolo, Flute 1/2, Oboe 1/2, Clarinet 1/2 in Bb, Bassoon 1/2, Trumpet 1/2 in C, Trumpet 3 in C, Horn 1/3, Horn 2/4, Trombone 1/2, Trombone 3, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Solo Marimba, Piano, Timpani, Percussion 1 (Bells, Brake Drum), Percussion 2 (Vibraphone, S). Orchestra Music. Grade 5. Score only. Duration 23:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11854). The Concerto for Marimba and Orchestra is a commission by a consortium of schools and performers headed by Professor Marc Wooldridge of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa.The work exploits the full range of the technical and expressive ability of the five-octave concert grand marimba. It is cast in the standard three-movement format. The first movement uses sonata-rondo form and begins with a slow introduction and quasi-cadenza by the marimba. An animated first theme follows in G-minor accompanied by clarinets and tambourine. A contrasting second theme area follows featuring chromatic mediant progressions and descending chromatic lines. The return of the first theme utilizes a slightly different accompaniment. The development section reworks all the thematic material in different guises. The recapitulation presents the first theme, verbatim, as it was in the exposition. The second theme, however, changes the mode to major. The return alternates the marimba on theme with the orchestra playing the theme in augmentation. The marimba quietly ends the movement with an ascending and descending arpeggiated passage.The second movement is a chaconne with eight variations. The marimba states a rather haunting chorale-like melody in Bb minor. The first variation features the horns and low strings on the chaconne theme with the marimba on the variation. Variation II uses marimba, oboe, and horns and Variation III uses marimba, vibraphone, and strings. Cascading muted brass against the augmented chaconne theme in the flutes and clarinets are indicative of Variation IV. Variation V changes the slow pace to fast using marimba, strings, timpani and bells. A haunting Variation VI utilizes bowed marimba on the chaconne theme accompanied by piano, bells, and vibraphone. Variation VII features the strings and low winds on the chaconne theme against triplets in the upper brass. Rolled arpeggiated chords highlight Variation VIII along with solo cello and solo violin on the second half of the variation. A somber coda brings the movement to a close.The third movement, like the first, is in sonata-rondo design and is cyclic, bringing back and combining the thematic material of the first and second movements. The first theme, in D-minor, is angular and spirited, accompanied by strings and tambourine (reminiscent of Mvt. I). The second theme brings back the second theme of the first movement followed by the return of the first theme, now accompanied by horns, strings, and tambourine. The development combines and works thematic material from all three movements of the concerto. The recapitulation begins with the cellos on the first theme, followed by the horns and trumpets and finally, the marimba. The second theme brings back the chaconne of the second movement, this time in major with the marimba accompanying using rhythmic material taken from the first theme of the third movement. There is no formal return of the first theme. Instead, the marimba plays a cadenza in which the first theme material and the 2nd movement chaconne are developed. A galloping presto (coda) follows bringing the movement to a close in D major.- David R. GillinghamPRAISE FOR THE CONCERTO"The new Concerto for Marimba by David Gillingham is an intriguing, engaging, and challenging piece. I had so much fun playing it and I am planning to perform it everywhere!! It is a "must-try" for all marimbists!"She-e Wuworld-renowned solo marimba artist.
$45.00

Instruments: Piano, Flute, Clarinet, Oboe, Bassoon, Horn, B-Flat Trumpet, Bass Trombone, Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Vibraphone, Tuba, Piano and Keyboard, Woodwinds, Brass, Trumpet, Trombone
Genres: Classical
Concert Piece for Marimba & Orchestra by David J. Long. For Soloist(s) with Full Orchestra (flute 1/2, oboe 1/2, clarinet in Bb 1/2, bassoon 1/2, horn in F 1/2, horn in F 3/4, trumpet in Bb 1/2, percussion (timpani, suspended cymbal, tam-tam, chimes), solo marimba, violin I, violin II, viola, violoncello, contrabass). Medium. Score only. Duration 8:20. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.01171). Concert Piece requires 2-mallet technique only. Three pairs of yarn mallets are requested: medium soft, medium, and hard. Directions are given for rolling and generally remain in effect until a new direction is given.
$45.00

Instruments: Flute, B-Flat Clarinet, Oboe, Bassoon, Horn, Violin, Cello, Viola, Double Bass, B-Flat Trumpet, Percussion, Timpani, Marimba, Woodwinds, Clarinet, Brass, Strings, Trumpet
Genres: Classical
Concerto for Percussion Solo & Percussion Ensemble. (Solo Percussion feature). By Gary Ziek. For Solo with Percussion Ensemble (Percussion Solo, Player 1 - Bells. Crotales, Player 2 - Xylophone, Chimes (shared with Player 4), Player 3 - Vibraphone 1, Player 4 - Vibraphone 2, Chimes (shared with Player 2), Player 5 - Marimba 1 (4 oct.), Player 6 - Marimba 2 (4 oct.), Player 7 - Mar). Medium difficult. Score and parts. Duration 14:20. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.05383). Concerto for Percussion Solo was composed in January of 2001 as a showcase for the talents of percussionist Scott Herring. The concerto is in three connected movements and features the soloist on a variety of instruments, including marimba, vibraphone, bells, and crotales. A large percussion battery with two snare drums, multiple toms, brake drums, and bass drum is also used. The first movement, March, utilizes a quasi five-part rondo form. The movement starts with a solo snare drum, with the ensemble providing melodic interjections. The introduction builds to the first solo marimba entrance. A left hand ostinato leads to a melodic figure which alternates between six-eight and common time. A short snare drum solo sets up the middle section, in which the soloist and ensemble trade musical ideas. The multi-meter passage returns, with the soloist embellishing ensemble melodic figures. An abrupt modulation leads to the final section, which echoes the opening ideas of the movement. March ends with the soloist back on the snare drum, as it comes quietly to its conclusion. The concerto immediately segues into the second movement, Meditation, which begins with the ethereal sound of multiple sets of wind chimes. As the movement progresses, the soloist plays long, reflective lines over a simple accompaniment, on various combinations of keyboard percussion instruments. The movement builds to a moment of triumph, before returning to its initial contemplative state. Fantasia (a free flight of fantasy) immediately shatters the previous mood. A loud, cacophonous accompaniment provides a charged atmosphere for the soloist to utilize the percussion battery. A short melodic section, noble in character, leads to the initial climax of the final movement. The atmosphere abruptly changes again, as the ensemble and soloist embark upon a fast, violent new section. Musical lines are furiously exchanged, leading up to a thunderous percussive display. The mood is suddenly tinged with blues and jazz influences, letting the soloist function in a manner reminiscent of a drum set player. The final section of Fantasia begins with a unaccompanied marimba solo, played at breakneck speed. The ensemble begins to gradually join the soloist, as the movement builds to a final, fortissimo climax.
$75.00

Instruments: Percussion, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 1 in D Minor for Marimba. (Marimba Feature). By Noah D. Taylor. For Soloist(s) with Concert Band (Piccolo, Flute 1, Flute 2, Oboe 1, Oboe 2, Eb Clarinet, Bb Clarinet 1, Bb Clarinet 2, Bb Clarinet 3, Bb Bass Clarinet, Bassoon 1, Bassoon 2, Alto Saxophone 1, Alto Saxophone 2, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Bb Trumpet 1, Bb Trumpet 2, Bb Trumpet 3,). Percussion Music. Grade 5. Score only. Duration 30:00:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.10924). The Marimba Concerto No. 1 in D Minor was completed in August 2003. This concerto was composed for marimbist Brenton Dunnington and was Taylor's first work for a solo mallet-percussion instrument. Taylor's Concerto displays confident youth as the composer ambitiously recalls the Romanticism of the past. The work is a large-scale undertaking for the soloist and the orchestra. Taylor has truly constructed a solo part of transcendental technique and virtuosity. The Concerto is tangible and tuneful, visually captivating and memorable from the first encounter.The first movement employs late 19th century harmony blended with Taylor's personal aesthetics. The full and rich orchestration is most evident here. The movement also displays the endurance and facility of the soloist. The opening fanfare and romantic theme form the basis for shaping the movement. Taylor thoroughly develops the theme in a romantically expanded sonata form. The solo cadenza (with improvisational intent) emerges from the end of the development and drives on to explore the theme. It demands intricate, complete command of the marimba and fearless composure from the soloist to accomplish the aggressively fluctuating tempi, the broad dynamic spectrum, and perilous octave descents. After a brief adagio, the first movement reaches an exhilarating orchestral conclusion.The slow second movement, still rooted in romanticism, slips in and out of 20th century harmonies. The movement is a tale of love and passion. Titled Adagio, the movement, opening in C major, is monothematic, but for a brief recapitulation of the first movement's main theme. The movement's poignant melody is carried by each of the oboe, clarinet, and flute solos with marimba. There is a tender, recurring duo between solo marimba and harp followed by a dramatic, climactic chorale where the soloist employs six-mallet technique. The movement culminates in a vivid new statement of the movement's main melody and fades off into the distance.A thematic transformation develops several stages further in the third movement. The Finale is a hero's tale of battle, danger, love, and triumph. Each section evokes a different account on the journey. Taylor reemphasizes the D minor tonality of the opening movement. The third movement bursts into the exhilarating and vigorous first subject, which features a thrilling rhythmic motif and interchange between the soloist and orchestra. The tale moves through a central, lyrical episode in place of a development section. Again, earlier material is recalled. As the final Vivace builds to a climax, the soloist unleashes fiery virtuosity with the orchestra. The majestic recapitulation, now in D major, surveys all of the Finale's opening material concluded by the coda in a brilliant presto and fortissimo.
$60.00

Instruments: Flute, B-Flat Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, E-Flat Clarinet, Oboe, Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bassoon, B-Flat Trumpet, Percussion, Marimba, Woodwinds, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, Brass
Genres: Classical
Concerto for Percussion Solo by Gary Ziek. Percussion Ensemble. For Percussion (solo percussion (4.6-octave marimba, vibraphone, crotales, bells, marching snare drum, concert snare drum, 4 toms, bass drum, 2 bongos, 2 brake drums, 2 suspended cymbals), piano). Concertos. Medium difficult. Piano reduction. Duration 14:20. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.05382). The Concerto for Percussion Solo and Wind Ensemble was composed in January of 2001 as a showcase for the talents of percussionist Scott Herring. The concerto is in three connected movements and features the soloist on a variety of instruments, including marimba, vibraphone, bells, and crotales. A large percussion battery with two snare drums, multiple toms, brake drums, and bass drum is also used. The first movement, March, utilizes a quasi five-part rondo form. The movement starts with a solo snare drum, with the ensemble providing melodic interjections. The introduction builds to the first solo marimba entrance. A left hand ostinato leads to a melodic figure which alternates between 6/8 and 4/4. A short snare drum solo sets up the middle section, in which the soloist and ensemble trade musical ideas. The multi-meter passage returns, with the soloist embellishing ensemble melodic figures. An abrupt modulation leads to the final section, which echoes the opening ideas of the movement. March ends with the soloist back on the snare drum, as it comes quietly to its conclusion. The concerto immediately segues into the second movement, Meditation, which begins with the ethereal sound of multiple sets of wind chimes. As the movement progresses, the soloist plays long, reflective lines over a simple ensemble accompaniment, on various combinations of keyboard percussion instruments. The movement builds to a moment of triumph, before returning to its initial contemplative state. Fantasia (a free flight of fancy) immediately shatters the previous mood. A loud, cacophonous ensemble accompaniment provides a charged atmosphere for the soloist to utilize the percussion battery. A short melodic section, noble in character, leads to the initial climax of the final movement. The atmosphere abruptly changes again, as the ensemble and soloist embark upon a fast, violent new section. Musical lines are furiously exchanged, leading up to a thunderous percussive display. The mood is suddenly tinged with blues and jazz influences, letting the soloist function in a manner reminiscent of a drum set player. The final section of Fantasia begins with an unaccompanied marimba solo, played at breakneck speed. The ensemble begins to gradually join the soloist, as the movement build to a final, fortissimo climax.
$32.00

Instruments: Piano, Percussion, Snare Drum, Marimba, Vibraphone, Piano and Keyboard, Drums
Genres: Classical
Concertino for 4 Percussion by David Gillingham. Percussion Ensemble. For Percussion (solo percussion 1 (timpani, bells, crash cymbal, suspended cymbal, bass drums, tam-tam), solo percussion 2 (marimba, xylophone, tam-tam), solo percussion 3 (marimba, hi-hat), solo percussion 4 (vibraphone, chimes, triangle, bass drums), piano). Concertos. Medium difficult. Piano reduction. Duration 9:30. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.02872). The original conception of this work, Concertino for Four Percussion and Wind Ensemble, was commissioned by the Oklahoma State University Wind Ensemble, Joseph Missal, conductor and Wayne Bovenschen, Professor of Percussion studies.The Concertino or "small concerto" seeks to exploit keyboard, membrane, and auxiliary percussion instruments with the marimbas, xylophone, timpani, vibraphone, and bass drums as the featured instruments, assisted by crash cymbals, suspended cymbal, tam-tam, bells, chimes, triangle, and hi-hat to enhance both the ensemble and the solo instruments.Two thematic motives are used as a point of departure for this work. Both appear in the slow and mysterious introduction. The first, played by the marimbas, is dramatic and the second is haunting and played by the vibraphone and bells. The following Allegro is structured similar to a rondo with recurrences of both themes interspersed by episodic sections. The first theme, however, is transformed into a very lively arpeggiated tune played by the xylophone and marimba. The coda is marked by a relentless rhythmic competition of two sets of bass drums which accompany the primary thematic material as first heard in the slow introduction. The work draws to a resounding conclusion when the second haunting theme is stated dramatically in tour de force by the brass.Concertino for Four Percussion is also available for performance with Wind Ensemble (CAP 02870) and Piano (CAP 02872).
$36.00

Instruments: Piano, Percussion, Timpani, Drums, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Piano and Keyboard
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 2 for Marimba by David Gillingham. Percussion Ensemble. For Marimba (5-octave), Piano. Concertos. Medium difficult. Piano reduction. Duration 23:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11852). The Concerto for Marimba is a commission by a consortium of schools and performers headed by Professor Marc Wooldridge of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa.The work exploits the full range of the technical and expressive ability of the five-octave concert grand marimba. It is cast in the standard three-movement format. The first movement uses sonata-rondo form and begins with a slow introduction and quasi-cadenza by the marimba. An animated first theme follows in G-minor accompanied by clarinets and tambourine. A contrasting second theme area follows featuring chromatic mediant progressions and descending chromatic lines. The return of the first theme utilizes a slightly different accompaniment. The development section reworks all the thematic material in different guises. The recapitulation presents the first theme, verbatim, as it was in the exposition. The second theme, however, changes the mode to major. The return alternates the marimba on the theme with the winds playing the theme in augmentation. The marimba quietly ends the movement with an ascending and descending arpeggiated passage.The second movement is a chaconne with eight variations. The marimba states a rather haunting chorale-like melody in Bb minor. The first variation features the low brass on the chaconne theme with the marimba on the variation. Variation II uses marimba, clarinet, bells, and vibraphone and Variation III uses marimba, oboe, and horns. Cascading muted brass against the augmented chaconne theme in the flutes and clarinets are indicative of Variation IV. Variation V changes the slow pace to fast using marimba, brass, timpani, and bells. A haunting Variation VI utilizes bowed marimba on the chaconne theme accompanied by piano and bells. Variation VII features the low brass on the chaconne theme against triplets in the upper brass. Rolled arpeggiated chords highlight Variation VIII along with a solo alto saxophone on the second half of the variation. A somber coda brings the movement to a close.The third movement, like the first, is in sonata-rondo design and is cyclic, bringing back and combining the thematic material of the first and second movements. The first theme, in D-minor, is angular and spirited, accompanied by clarinets and tambourine (reminiscent of Mvt. I). The second theme brings back the second theme of the first movement followed by the return of the first theme, now accompanied by saxophones and tambourine. The development combines and works thematic material from all three movements of the concerto. The recapitulation begins with the bassoons on the first theme, followed by the horns/trumpets and finally, the marimba. The second theme brings back the chaconne of the second movement, this time in major with the marimba accompanying using rhythmic material taken from the first theme of the third movement. There is no formal return of the first theme. Instead, the marimba plays a cadenza in which the first theme material and the second movement chaconne are developed. A galloping presto (coda) follows, ending the movement in D major.- David R. Gillingham.
$50.00

Instruments: Piano, Percussion, Marimba, Piano and Keyboard
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 2 for Marimba & Wind Ensemble. (Marimba Feature). By David Gillingham. For Soloist(s) with Concert Band (Piccolo, Flute 1/2, Oboe 1/2 , Bassoon 1/2, Clarinet in Bb 1/2, Clarinet in Bb 3, Bass Clarinet, Alto Saxophone 1/2, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet in Bb 1, Trumpet in Bb 2/3, Horn in F 1/3, Horn in F 2/4, Trombone 1/2, Bass Trombone, Euphon). Band Music. Grade 4. Score only. Duration 23:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11851). The Concerto No. 2 for Marimba is a commission by a consortium of schools and performers headed by Professor Marc Wooldridge of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa.The work exploits the full range of the technical and expressive ability of the five-octave concert grand marimba. It is cast in the standard three-movement format. The first movement uses sonata-rondo form and begins with a slow introduction and quasi-cadenza by the marimba. An animated first theme follows in G-minor accompanied by clarinets and tambourine. A contrasting second theme area follows featuring chromatic mediant progressions and descending chromatic lines. The return of the first theme utilizes a slightly different accompaniment. The development section reworks all the thematic material in different guises. The recapitulation presents the first theme, verbatim, as it was in the exposition. The second theme, however, changes the mode to major. The return alternates the marimba on the theme with the winds playing the theme in augmentation. The marimba quietly ends the movement with an ascending and descending arpeggiated passage.The second movement is a chaconne with eight variations. The marimba states a rather haunting chorale-like melody in Bb minor. The first variation features the low brass on the chaconne theme with the marimba on the variation. Variation II uses marimba, clarinet, bells, and vibraphone and Variation III uses marimba, oboe, and horns. Cascading muted brass against the augmented chaconne theme in the flutes and clarinets are indicative of Variation IV. Variation V changes the slow pace to fast using marimba, brass, timpani, and bells. A haunting Variation VI utilizes bowed marimba on the chaconne theme accompanied by piano and bells. Variation VII features the low brass on the chaconne theme against triplets in the upper brass. Rolled arpeggiated chords highlight Variation VIII along with a solo alto saxophone on the second half of the variation. A somber coda brings the movement to a close.The third movement, like the first, is in sonata-rondo design and is cyclic, bringing back and combining the thematic material of the first and second movements. The first theme, in D-minor, is angular and spirited, accompanied by clarinets and tambourine (reminiscent of Mvt. I). The second theme brings back the second theme of the first movement followed by the return of the first theme, now accompanied by saxophones and tambourine. The development combines and works thematic material from all three movements of the concerto. The recapitulation begins with the bassoons on the first theme, followed by the horns/trumpets and finally, the marimba. The second theme brings back the chaconne of the second movement, this time in major with the marimba accompanying using rhythmic material taken from the first theme of the third movement. There is no formal return of the first theme. Instead, the marimba plays a cadenza in which the first theme material and the second movement chaconne are developed. A galloping presto (coda) follows, ending the movement in D major.- David R. Gillingham.
$45.00

Instruments: Flute, B-Flat Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Oboe, Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bassoon, Horn, B-Flat Trumpet, Bass Trombone, Marimba, Woodwinds, Clarinet, Saxophone, Brass, Trumpet, Trombone, Percussion
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 2 for Marimba & Wind Ensemble. (Marimba Feature). By David Gillingham. For Soloist(s) with Concert Band (Piccolo, Flute 1/2, Oboe 1/2 , Bassoon 1/2, Clarinet in Bb 1/2, Clarinet in Bb 3, Bass Clarinet, Alto Saxophone 1/2, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Trumpet in Bb 1, Trumpet in Bb 2/3, Horn in F 1/3, Horn in F 2/4, Trombone 1/2, Bass Trombone, Euphon). Band Music. Grade 5. Score and parts. Duration 23:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.11850). The Concerto No. 2 for Marimba is a commission by a consortium of schools and performers headed by Professor Marc Wooldridge of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa.The work exploits the full range of the technical and expressive ability of the five-octave concert grand marimba. It is cast in the standard three-movement format. The first movement uses sonata-rondo form and begins with a slow introduction and quasi-cadenza by the marimba. An animated first theme follows in G-minor accompanied by clarinets and tambourine. A contrasting second theme area follows featuring chromatic mediant progressions and descending chromatic lines. The return of the first theme utilizes a slightly different accompaniment. The development section reworks all the thematic material in different guises. The recapitulation presents the first theme, verbatim, as it was in the exposition. The second theme, however, changes the mode to major. The return alternates the marimba on the theme with the winds playing the theme in augmentation. The marimba quietly ends the movement with an ascending and descending arpeggiated passage.The second movement is a chaconne with eight variations. The marimba states a rather haunting chorale-like melody in Bb minor. The first variation features the low brass on the chaconne theme with the marimba on the variation. Variation II uses marimba, clarinet, bells, and vibraphone and Variation III uses marimba, oboe, and horns. Cascading muted brass against the augmented chaconne theme in the flutes and clarinets are indicative of Variation IV. Variation V changes the slow pace to fast using marimba, brass, timpani, and bells. A haunting Variation VI utilizes bowed marimba on the chaconne theme accompanied by piano and bells. Variation VII features the low brass on the chaconne theme against triplets in the upper brass. Rolled arpeggiated chords highlight Variation VIII along with a solo alto saxophone on the second half of the variation. A somber coda brings the movement to a close.The third movement, like the first, is in sonata-rondo design and is cyclic, bringing back and combining the thematic material of the first and second movements. The first theme, in D-minor, is angular and spirited, accompanied by clarinets and tambourine (reminiscent of Mvt. I). The second theme brings back the second theme of the first movement followed by the return of the first theme, now accompanied by saxophones and tambourine. The development combines and works thematic material from all three movements of the concerto. The recapitulation begins with the bassoons on the first theme, followed by the horns/trumpets and finally, the marimba. The second theme brings back the chaconne of the second movement, this time in major with the marimba accompanying using rhythmic material taken from the first theme of the third movement. There is no formal return of the first theme. Instead, the marimba plays a cadenza in which the first theme material and the second movement chaconne are developed. A galloping presto (coda) follows, ending the movement in D major.- David R. Gillingham.
$165.60

Instruments: Flute, B-Flat Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Oboe, Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Bassoon, Horn, B-Flat Trumpet, Bass Trombone, Marimba, Woodwinds, Clarinet, Saxophone, Brass, Trumpet, Trombone, Percussion
Genres: Classical
Aria by Emma Lou Diemer (1927-). Arranged by Nathan Daughtrey. Percussion Ensemble. For Marimba Quartet (marimba 1 (4-octave), marimba 2 (4-octave), marimba 3 (4.3-octave), marimba 4 (5-octave), *playable on one 4.3-octave marimba & one 5-octave marimba). Medium easy. Score and parts. Duration 4:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.08424). Aria, originally written for solo organ (published by Zimbel Press), was arranged by Emma Lou Diemer for string orchestra in 2003 (published by C. Alan Publications). The lush, warm sounds of the organ and string orchestra translated seamlessly into a beautifully lyrical work for marimba quartet.
$20.00

Instruments: Percussion, Marimba
Genres: 20th Century, Classical
Concertino for Marimba and Wind Ensemble. (Marimba Feature). By Thomas Briggs. Marimba solo and concert band. For Soloist(s) with Concert Band (Marimba Concerto). Grade 4. Score only. Duration 6:45. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.03061). A fun and accessible piece for the developing marimbist. This two mallet work with band is perfect for the high school or college ensemble wanting to feature a talented percussionist.
$20.00

Instruments: Marimba, Percussion
Genres: Classical
Concerto No. 1 in D Minor for Marimba by Noah D. Taylor. Percussion Ensemble. For Marimba (5-octave), Piano. Concertos. Medium difficult. Piano reduction. Duration 30:00:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.10920). The Marimba Concerto No. 1 in D Minor was completed in August 2003. This concerto was composed for marimbist Brenton Dunnington and was Taylor's first work for a solo mallet-percussion instrument. Taylor's Concerto displays confident youth as the composer ambitiously recalls the Romanticism of the past. The work is a large-scale undertaking for the soloist and the orchestra. Taylor has truly constructed a solo part of transcendental technique and virtuosity. The Concerto is tangible and tuneful, visually captivating and memorable from the first encounter.The first movement employs late 19th century harmony blended with Taylor's personal aesthetics. The full and rich orchestration is most evident here. The movement also displays the endurance and facility of the soloist. The opening fanfare and romantic theme form the basis for shaping the movement. Taylor thoroughly develops the theme in a romantically expanded sonata form. The solo cadenza (with improvisational intent) emerges from the end of the development and drives on to explore the theme. It demands intricate, complete command of the marimba and fearless composure from the soloist to accomplish the aggressively fluctuating tempi, the broad dynamic spectrum, and perilous octave descents. After a brief adagio, the first movement reaches an exhilarating orchestral conclusion.The slow second movement, still rooted in romanticism, slips in and out of 20th century harmonies. The movement is a tale of love and passion. Titled Adagio, the movement, opening in C major, is monothematic, but for a brief recapitulation of the first movement's main theme. The movement's poignant melody is carried by each of the oboe, clarinet, and flute solos with marimba. There is a tender, recurring duo between solo marimba and harp followed by a dramatic, climactic chorale where the soloist employs six-mallet technique. The movement culminates in a vivid new statement of the movement's main melody and fades off into the distance.A thematic transformation develops several stages further in the third movement. The Finale is a hero's tale of battle, danger, love, and triumph. Each section evokes a different account on the journey. Taylor reemphasizes the D minor tonality of the opening movement. The third movement bursts into the exhilarating and vigorous first subject, which features a thrilling rhythmic motif and interchange between the soloist and orchestra. The tale moves through a central, lyrical episode in place of a development section. Again, earlier material is recalled. As the final Vivace builds to a climax, the soloist unleashes fiery virtuosity with the orchestra. The majestic recapitulation, now in D major, surveys all of the Finale's opening material concluded by the coda in a brilliant presto and fortissimo.- Noah D. Taylor.
$40.00

Instruments: Piano, Percussion, Marimba, Piano and Keyboard
Genres: Classical
Concertino for Marimba and Wind Ensemble by Thomas Briggs. Marimba solo and concert band. For Marimba (4.3-octave), Piano (Marimba Concerto). Concertos. Medium. Piano reduction. Duration 6:45. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.03062). A fun and accessible piece for the developing marimbist. This two mallet work with band is perfect for the high school or college ensemble wanting to feature a talented percussionist.
$24.00

Instruments: Piano, Marimba, Piano and Keyboard, Percussion
Genres: Classical
Gate to Heaven: Concerto No. 1 (for Marimba, Strings & Percussion). By Gillingham. Arranged by Nathan Daughtrey. For Soloist(s) with String Orchestra (Solo Marimba, Percussion 1 (xylophone, bells, chimes), Percussion 2 (brake drum, cowbell, shaker, suspended cymbal, crash cymbals, temple blocks, triangle), Percussion 3 (4 toms, crash cymbals, bass drum, suspended cymbal, tam tam, hi hat), Violin I, Viol). String Music. Medium difficult. Score only. Duration 16:30. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.03281). Though Gate to Heaven is structured as a three-movement concerto for solo marimba, it has extramusical inspiration. Each movement of the work reflects the movement of the soul into the portal of heaven. The first movement, titled "Remission," is indicative of death and the consequences of the soul's former life. From the onset of the first movement, the introduction captures the hard blows of death and the mysterious passage into the unknown world beyond. The ensuing presto is representative of the tribulations of the former life fluctuating between evil and ecstasy. The second movement, "Reflection," is a solemn look into the past life of the soul and suggests mixed emotions about the former life of the soul as a human form and its present state as energy moving through the infinite universe. Mournful bowed passages in the marimba toward the end of this movement are followed by a passage that builds to a rather joyous resolve that perhaps suggests the golden light of the portal of heaven at the end of the tunnel of transition. The final solemn strains of the movement represent the soul's final reflection upon its former life. "Redemption," the final movement, hopefully invokes whatever image one has of "heaven." It was the composer's intention to paint a musical image of golden light shining upon a rainbow-colored landscape. The movement is comprised of two alternating themes, the first energetic and full of sparkle and the second dramatic and full of splendor. Toward the end of the movement, a fragment of the reflective theme of the second movement is heard before the piece drives to a joyous conclusion.
$40.00

Instruments: Violin, Percussion, Marimba, Xylophone, Strings
Genres: Classical
Slavonic Dance, Op.46, No.1 by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904). Arranged by P. Zambito. Percussion Ensemble. For marimba duet (marimba 1 (4.3-octave), marimba 2 (5-octave)). Medium difficult. Duration 4:00. Published by C. Alan Publications (CN.09800). Originally written for piano 4-hands, Zambito has skillfully adapted Dvorak's masterwork for marimba duet. Op. 46, No. 1 is set in C major and moves along at a breakneck tempo. This exciting duet would make be a perfect closing number for a recital or even an encore.
$29.00

Instruments: Percussion, Marimba
Genres: Romantic Period, Classical